permaculture

Compost worm farms transform household waste into a resource, a very valuable resource, a nutrient-rich fertilizer (liquid and solid) while also closing the loop on food waste cycles in households. Compost worms are a great way to make your own …

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At the start of March 2020 the social enterprise Ecological Land Cooperative (ELC) announced a new Community Share Investment Offer. …

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Via www.greendreamsFL.com Last summer, we got to spend one of the best weeks of our lives with our dear friend & …

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Article by Maia Wikler | Video & Photos by Syd Woodward, Hemmie Lindholm & Alex Harris. This video and article …

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Screen Printed Over Grow The System patch by artist Bubzee . Printed on re claimed fabrics.

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INTERVIEW BY MAIA WIKLER – VIDEO & PHOTOS BY SYD WOODWARD & ALEX HARRIS. This video and article originally aired …

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From the outset its name sparked my curiosity, Freedom Cove. How can we be free and yet still have a sense of security, shelter and protection in modern society? Adventuring off to Cypress Bay, just north of Tofino B.C, we set out to explore how two artists keep afloat in a sinking economy.

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To most farmers it would take a pretty good reason to leave the fields in the midst of harvest time; …

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As soon as Geoff Lawton realized he was having “dreams of self-sufficiency and living in a harmonious way with natural systems,” he started getting involved with permaculture. This was way before permaculture was the buzz word that it is today. Through his work, the movement has spread to like-minded individuals the world over.

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“ Left to her own devices, Mother Nature builds topsoil, she enriches it with organic material, adds the products of water and wind erosion and thus deepens the layer of topsoil and lays the foundation for grass and later for forest cover.” ~ The Good Life by Helen and Scott Nearing.

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The original land, bought in 2009, is comprised of 2.2 rocky acres with a year round river marking the western border. By taking advantage of this river, the whole farm now has reliable, gravity-fed water, a system that has no moving parts, pumps, energy usage, or regular failures. While the land does have an abundance of water, the original soil was another story. The whole farm is rocky and covered in only thin layers of soil. Due to irresponsible corn cultivation techniques over the past few generations, our farm soil was very worn out and, while still rich in some minerals, it was severely lacking in organic matter and major nutrients. We should note that the original condition of our farm  is representative of much of the valley floor in which we are located. Naturally, the goal is that each year we are actually building more soil, covering rocks, and creating fertility.

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